Skip to content

Frequently Asked Questions

Can Dogs Travel on the Bus?

Yes, provided your pooch is well behaved, on a lead or in a carry box. Dogs must never travel on the seats. Dogs can travel all day for £1 using a Dog Rover ticket. 

Trained assistance dogs are carried free of charge on every bus. We’ve identified (with thanks to customers) the most appropriate seats on buses where customers with assistance dogs can sit and they will be labelled to encourage other customers to give them up for you.

Can I Bring a Bike on the Bus?

Folding bikes, small children's bikes or a scooter can be carried, provided it fits in the luggage rack. However, our buses are not insured or designed to carry larger bikes.

How Can A Bus Be Full, But Have Empty Seats?

There is a legal maximum number of people a bus can carry.

This maximum number is determined by weight (to comply with the regulations on how heavy a full bus can be), rather than the actual space available inside a bus. This means that big buses, like our older double decks, can have very few standing customers even though there is quite a lot of room.

This maximum number of people is broken down into seated and standing. The figure quoted for standing assumes every seat is taken. However, there is no legal requirement or expectation for customers to use the seats and sometimes people choose to stand instead.

For example…

  • A double deck can carry a maximum of 88 people, where there are 86 seats and 2 standees
  • If 86 people take a seat, the bus can have 2 standees and reaches the maximum of 88
  • If 82 people take a seat, the bus can have 6 standees and reaches the maximum of 88

Therefore, if there are several standees (which appears to be over the maximum number shown), a bus can be full even though some of the seats aren’t being used because the bus is carrying the maximum of 88 people.

What Happens If I Witness or Experience Crime on the Bus?

Thankfully this type of behaviour is very rare and there has been a significant drop in incidents on buses over the last decade thanks to CCTV on every bus and an excellent partnership we have with Nottinghamshire Police.

If you experience or witness any crime on the bus, please alert the driver in the first instance and then report the matter to the Police.

When drivers are aware of any incidents, they will contact our Control Room to request assistance from the Police and/or an Inspector on the bus. Through our partnership, we share CCTV footage and work very closely with Nottinghamshire Police to ensure the small number of people who commit crime on buses are dealt with.

In 2017, we joined other operators and organisations in Nottingham to sign the "No to Hate" Pledge and all of our drivers have been trained on how to assist people in the event of a hate crime.

Why Is it So Hot on the Bus in the Summer and Why No Air-Con?

The simple answer is because it’s hot outside and like in your home, you feel the heat when you’re inside too. Unlike your home (buy maybe like your greenhouse if you’re a gardener), our buses have a large number of windows in a confined area, which results in them heating up quickly. We specify ‘forced air ventilation’ on our buses to keep fresh ambient air moving through the bus, which prevents the air becoming too close and stagnant. This works in the same way as a fan in your home or office and keeps the air moving. However, if the ambient temperature is 30°C then that will be the temperature of the air being circulated.  This may feel to a customer that the air is being heated but it isn’t (other than by the sun!). 

We specify the maximum number of opening windows possible. This is largely driven by bus window glass being manufactured in standard sizes and buses have to have some non-standard sized windows as dictated by the length and structure of the bus (which is heavily legislated).

Air conditioning isn't a feature we specify for environmental, economic and practical reasons. Just as in a car, air conditioning takes a substantial amount of energy out of the engine. The power needed to provide air conditioning in the customer area of the big buses we use would be so great that a larger engine would be required and bigger wheels to cope with the extra weight. This would consume more fuel, generate more emissions (Nottingham has been criticised for high emissions) and also reduce the number of seats for customers on the bus. As our British summers are only for a few weeks a year (if we’re lucky!) it is neither economically or environmentally viable to upgrade our fleet in this way. 

On a practical level, air conditioning wouldn't work. With heavily used city buses like ours, which makes regular stops and open their doors frequently (unlike longer distance services and coaches that go some distance between stops, giving the air con the chance to do its job), air conditioning just wouldn’t work on a practical level. The cooler air would leave the bus every time people got on or off the bus and be replaced by the hotter external air.

Live Bus Times